• Management

    What is a manager’s top attribute?

    It was a warm Italian night as I sat on a terrace with a friend, sipping a good glass of tasty white wine. A friend’s friend joined us, we introduced ourselves and I learned he was a manager in tech, just like me. After a few minutes of talking about our experiences, he shot me a sharp question: What is the most important attribute of a successful manager? I had never thought about it before, so I was surprised when I saw my uncertainty last less than 5 seconds. My guts took control of my brain and spoke for me. Self-Confidence – I said. “Now I have to articulate the…

  • Management

    Delegation = laziness?

    Why don’t you delegate? Books have been written on the importance of delegation.Frameworks have been defined, along with diagrams and thorough explanations of what should be delegated and what not, for example: There are also diagrams and guidelines to help identify whom to delegate tasks to, but that is definitely outside of the scope of this post. Now, many managers agree on the importance of delegating tasks. However, surprisingly enough, throughout my career, I have met many managers who struggled with delegation. What were the main causes? In short: Fear of losing control. Fear of becoming useless to the company. Fear of being perceived as “lazy”. Are those valid reasons?…

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    Uncategorized

    Just do it Now. Or, improve every day.

    The 1% marginal gains rule There has been quite a bit of buzz on the so-called 1% marginal gains rule. This “rule” became famous after Dave Brailsford, performance director of British Cycling, set about breaking down the objective of winning races into its component parts. The basic concept is easy: if we work on improving a mere 1% a day – or a week, or else – then the cumulative gain would be massive. Nothing new, really. Is the 1% marginal gain rule a recent concept? I don’t believe so. If we think about anything we do in our lives, a tiny bit of knowledge is added to our brain…

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    Management

    Make Meetings Productive

    One thing I have learned very soon in my career is: meetings must be useful for all the participants. A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away… I have vivid memories of managers of mine looking very busy, always telling people they had a meeting in a few minutes. Sometimes it was true, while some other times they just wanted to dismiss whoever stepped into our office, but the effect they obtained was, either way, powerful: people believed they were really busy, with much more important things to do than listen to their colleagues.And those managers felt powerful: they could wear cool suits and ties and meet important…

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